Politics

The National Debt is Out of Control and Nobody in D.C. is Concerned

2019 is coming to a close tomorrow at midnight. The end of this decade has been filled with the impeachment of a President for abuse of power, but there is one big issue that everyone in Washington D.C. seems to ignore, the national debt.

As this decade comes to a close and we venture into a new era the countries debt has topped $23 Trillion. That equates to over $70,000 for every citizen in the United States.

Now, lets take a look at what the national debt looked like in 2010 when this current decade started with Obama as President.

Now, when President Trump took over in 2016:

In 10 years the debt of this country has risen over $10 Trillion. Both political parties are to blame for this mess and we constantly get fooled into believing that someone is going to come along and stop this madness.

There were promises that Trump was going to “Drain the Swamp” and not even four years into his Presidency he has added $3 Trillion to the national debt. The crazy amount of spending that is done by Democrats and Republicans in D.C. is getting outrageous.

The Peter G. Peterson Foundation says “given the size of the debt today, over the next decade, the government is projected to spend about $6 trillion on interest payments — more than it will spend on children.”

Adding “addressing the national debt is critical to strengthening America’s economic future, because it would enable the U.S. to invest in crucial areas of the federal budget. Hopefully, policymakers can learn from the past decade and take the opportunity to correct our fiscal course.”

The biggest threat to America is not a terrorist that is hiding in some cave in Afghanistan but rather our inability to control our financial future. Politicians are passing the buck to future generations and ignoring the economic forecasts that show this country going bankrupt. We need real leadership in Washington to curb this addiction to spending and start acting like we understand the true nature of fiscal responsibility.

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